Beyond the Rhetoric

 
 
 

Posts Tagged ‘word choice’

Grammar 101: Phase or Faze Me

January 27th, 2015

Once again, we encounter a couple of words that sound exactly the same when they are said but have entirely different spellings and meanings when they are written out. As with so many of these word pairs, the confusion between phase and faze is further exacerbated by the fact that the latter is uttered far […]

Grammar 101: At a Loss for Words

January 19th, 2015

There are multiple levels to the English language. You start with the literal meaning, discern the implied meaning and unearth the symbolic meaning. With so many English idioms and sayings, non-native speakers can sometimes struggle with understanding what someone is actually trying to say. One such example is the phrase “at a loss for words.”

Grammar 101: Inquiry and Enquiry

January 5th, 2015

Is there a difference between inquiry and enquiry or can the two words be used interchangeably? Well, as with so many other spelling and grammar issues, the answer can be a little complex. A big part of this has to do with the difference between American and Canadian (British) spelling, as what may be true […]

Grammar 101: Lead and Led

December 9th, 2014

The English language can be confusing enough when you have two words that sound the same, but are spelled differently and have entirely different meanings. Things get even more confusing when you have words that are spelled the same, but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, as well as being interconnected with other words […]

Grammar 101: On Revisionist Pronunciation

December 2nd, 2014

When two words have the same pronunciation and one is written far more often than the other, you might struggle with choosing the right one. Someone might use “segway” when they really mean to write “segue” instead. That can cause some confusion, to be sure, but what happens when someone decides to say an existing […]

Grammar 101: Newborn, Baby or Infant?

November 25th, 2014

Even when words have very similar definitions, they can carry wildly different connotations. Whether you refer to the “accused” or the “defendant” in a criminal court case could impact how someone interprets what you say. A house may be just a physical building, but you may have more emotional attachment to your home. And that […]

Grammar 101: Leech and Leach

November 17th, 2014

If you have a good-for-nothing acquaintance who is constantly mooching off of the people around him, if this person is always trying to extract resources from others, you might call this person a leech. Or is he a leach? Both leech and leach are pronounced exactly the same way, but just like site and cite, […]

Grammar 101: Toe the Line or Tow the Line?

October 2nd, 2014

You may have heard the English idiom “to toe the line.” Oftentimes, it’s used in the context of work, where employees are told to “toe the company line.” The workers are being told to conform to the rules, principles and policies of the company, to do exactly as they are told and not to veer […]