Beyond the Rhetoric

 
 
 

Posts Tagged ‘grammar’

Grammar 101: Punctuating Do’s and Don’ts

May 19th, 2015

In addition to word choice, word order and spelling, another area of grammar that deserves your attention is punctuation. Using the right punctuation marks in the right context can dramatically elevate your writing to another level… and using punctuation incorrectly can equally detract from your writing too. What happens when the do’s and don’t of […]

Grammar 101: Supine vs. Prone Position

May 12th, 2015

With a great number of posts in the Grammar 101 series, I discuss pairs of words that people may get confused for whatever reason. More often than not, the word pairs are homophones (words that sound the same) and at least one of the words is rarely found in casual writing. Today’s entry is a […]

Grammar 101: Immoral vs. Amoral

May 7th, 2015

The English language contains many prefixes meant to indicate some form of negation. While it may appear that many of these are roughly equivalent, they may offer slightly different interpretations. You may be unable (adjective) to perform, but you can disable (adverb) a machine. Even though they both use the root word able, “unable” and […]

Grammar 101: Aisle and Isle

April 23rd, 2015

It never ceases to amaze me how many of these Grammar 101 posts are inspired by status updates on Facebook. Today is no exception. Now, it’s important to note that I’m not faulting any of my Facebook friends for making such errors, per se, so long as they endeavor to avoid making the same mistakes […]

Grammar 101: A Nervous Tick

April 17th, 2015

Having an automatic spell checking utility built into your web browser, app or mobile device can be a very helpful thing. It can help you catch those random errors and typos that you may make. It can also give you a false sense of confidence that you are spelling your words correctly. This is perhaps […]

Grammar 101: Allergic vs. Allergenic

April 9th, 2015

The words “allergic” and “allergenic” are both related to allergies, but they have different meanings and cannot be used interchangeably. This is similar to what we find with word pairs like venomous and poisonous. A snake might be venomous (active administration of poison), while certain plants might be poisonous (passive administration of poison). So, what’s […]

Grammar 101: Hold Down the Fort

April 2nd, 2015

No one ever said that English idioms have to make logical sense. I don’t think there are going to be too many circumstances where any old fellow could indeed be determined as the uncle of a monkey. I also don’t think that rainfall would ever get quite so torrential as to cause a number of […]

Grammar 101: On Collective Nouns

March 17th, 2015

In your writing, it is important to be mindful of subject-verb agreement. A singular noun corresponds to one form of a verb, while a plural noun correponds with a different form of a verb. He chooses, but they choose. Joan runs, but the cats run. This can be complicated with the introduction of collective nouns. […]