Beyond the Rhetoric

 
 
 

Posts Tagged ‘grammar tips’

Grammar 101: Amy Likes Cookies

July 23rd, 2015

The objective behind the Grammar 101 series on this blog is not to be pedantic or to demonstrate my superior grasp of the English language. (I mean, I consider myself to be a pretty good writer, as it’s what I do for a living, but I can make mistakes too.) The objective is more about […]

Grammar 101: A Bad Rap or a Bad Rep

July 13th, 2015

Elaine totally gets a bad rap among her co-workers, but she’s actually a very nice person when you get to know her. Or is that a bad wrap? Maybe it’s a bad rep? What is the correct term to use in this context? Perhaps we should first start with a basic definition. A “bad rap” […]

Grammar 101: Authoritative vs. Authoritarian

June 19th, 2015

The words “authoritative” and “authoritarian” sound awfully similar, because they both share a common root word. Yes, they both have something to do with authority, but their definitions are vastly different. Indeed, confusing one term for the other could have a dramatic (and possibly confusing) impact on the meaning that you are trying to convey […]

Grammar 101: Silicon and Silicone

June 12th, 2015

Changing one letter, even if it has a minimal (if any) impact on pronunciation, can have a dramatic impact on the meaning of a word. We’ve explored this with aide and aid, capitol and capital, and canvas and canvass, among others. You really have to be careful about your word choice and spelling, because you […]

Grammar 101: On Pinchers and Pincer Grips

June 4th, 2015

As a new dad, I’ve come across a lot of new baby terminology these last several months. Some of these are associated with various baby products, like layettes made of muslin. Other terms have to do with major milestones, like when the little one finally develops a pincer grip to pick up finger foods. Or […]

Grammar 101: The Curious Case of “Nor”

May 28th, 2015

English can be a very confusing and contradictory language with all of its rules and innumerable exceptions. As a result, it is not uncommon for people to over-correct their grammar, misusing “myself” or “I” when just regular old “me” will do. And the same can be said about how to use “nor” correctly.

Grammar 101: Punctuating Do’s and Don’ts

May 19th, 2015

In addition to word choice, word order and spelling, another area of grammar that deserves your attention is punctuation. Using the right punctuation marks in the right context can dramatically elevate your writing to another level… and using punctuation incorrectly can equally detract from your writing too. What happens when the do’s and don’t of […]

Grammar 101: Immoral vs. Amoral

May 7th, 2015

The English language contains many prefixes meant to indicate some form of negation. While it may appear that many of these are roughly equivalent, they may offer slightly different interpretations. You may be unable (adjective) to perform, but you can disable (adverb) a machine. Even though they both use the root word able, “unable” and […]