Beyond the Rhetoric

 
 
 

Archive for the ‘Freelance Writing’ Category

Grammar 101: Critique and Criticism

July 19th, 2016

On the surface, the words “critique” and “criticism” sound like they are fundamentally the same. Someone is offering his or her opinion on something. That something could be a painting, a movie, a smartphone, a social event… just about anything. The person has evaluated this thing and he or she has something to say about […]

Grammar 101: Maybe vs. May Be

July 11th, 2016

Change one letter and you can completely alter the meaning of a word. We see this with “affect” and “effect.” And then you get more confusing situations like with “all right” and “alright,” but what if the only difference is the inclusion or omission of a space? Do you know when you should use “maybe” […]

Grammar 101: Another Comma Demonstration

June 24th, 2016

Punctuation is a funny business. Put a different mark at the end of a word or sentence and you can completely change its perceived meaning. Whereas “hello?” has an inherent questioning tone, “hello!” is much more forceful and “hello…” is more tentative. I’ve written before about the power of the comma. Yesterday, I inadvertently came […]

Grammar 101: Might as Well (Not Minus Well)

June 14th, 2016

In my experience, many of the mistakes that people make with spelling and grammar are caused by the great divide between spoken and written language. Many common phrases are spoken far more often than they are found in everyday print. That’s why people come to write about how to “make due” or that time they […]

Grammar 101: The Girl Is No One

May 30th, 2016

One goose, many geese. One moose, many meese? One mouse, many mice. One house, many hice? English doesn’t make much sense sometimes. You think you’ve got a grasp on a system or a pattern, only to be thrown for a loop with one of the many exceptions. A good example of this is when you […]

Grammar 101: Deep-Seated or Deep-Seeded?

May 13th, 2016

Jeff harbored a deep-seated resentment against his father. The XYZ Foundation bases its decisions on a set of deep-seated beliefs. Carol’s deep-seated sense of loyalty convinced her to stay despite grossly unfavorable conditions. The phrasal adjective “deep-seated” is another one of those English idioms that can be a source of confusion, even among native speakers. […]

Grammar 101: Chomping at the Bit

May 6th, 2016

Idiomatic phrases like this demonstrate once again that English can be a terribly confusing language. Something that seems perfectly logical and correct could be seen as wrong. Are you champing at the bit to find out what’s right?

Grammar 101: The Past Tense of Cost (Costed)

April 28th, 2016

No one in their right mind thinks that Facebook is a glowing bastion for perfect spelling and grammar. Typos run rampant on the social network, and those can be more easily forgiven in such a casual context, but out-and-out errors still need to be avoided. Just the other day, one of my friends wrote that […]